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Thursday, February 26, 2009

Create a PivotTable or PivotChart report

To create a PivotTable or PivotChart report, you must connect to a data source and enter the report's location.This post provide Microsoft excel support tips to create pivot table.

1. Select a cell in a range of cells, or put the insertion point inside of a Microsoft Office Excel table.

Make sure that the range of cells has column headings.
2. Select the type of report to generate by doing one of the following:
* To create a PivotTable report, on the Insert tab, in the Tables group, click PivotTable, and then click PivotTable.

Excel displays the Create PivotTable dialog box.
* To create a PivotTable and PivotChart report, on the Insert tab, in the Tables group, click PivotTable, and then click PivotChart.

Excel displays the Create PivotTable with PivotChart dialog box.

Select a data source by doing one of the following:

Choose the data that you want to analyze

1. Click Select a table or range.
2. Type the range of cells or table name reference, such as =QuarterlyProfits, in the Table/Range box.

If you selected a cell in a range of cells or if the insertion point was in a table before you started the wizard, Excel displays the range of cells or table name reference in the Table/Range box.

Alternatively, to select a range of cells or table, click Collapse Dialog Button image to temporarily hide the dialog box, select the range on the worksheet, and then press Expand Dialog Button image.

Tip Consider using a table name reference instead of a range of cells, because rows added to a table are automatically included in the PivotTable report when you refresh the data.

Note If the range is in another worksheet in the same workbook or another workbook, type the workbook and worksheet name by using the following syntax: ([workbookname]sheetname!range).

Friday, February 20, 2009

How to Create a self-signing certificate

Because a digital certificate that you create isn't issued by a formal certificate authority, macro projects that are signed by using such a certificate are referred to as self-signed projects. Microsoft Office trusts a self-signed certificate only on a computer that has that certificate in your Personal Certificates store.

Follow the steps given below:

Steps to Windows Vista

1. Click the Start button, point to All Programs, click Microsoft Office, click Microsoft Office Tools, and then click Digital Certificate for VBA Projects. In the Your certificate's name box, type a descriptive name for the certificate.
2. When the certificate confirmation message appears, click OK.

To view the certificate in the Personal Certificates store, do the following:

1. Open Windows Internet Explorer.
2. On the Tools menu, click Internet Options, and then click the Content tab.
3. Click Certificates, and then click the Personal tab.

Steps to Windows XP

1. Click the Start button, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Office, point to Microsoft Office Tools, and then click Digital Certificate for VBA Projects. In the Your certificate's name box, type a descriptive name for the certificate.
2. When the certificate confirmation message appears, click OK.

To view the certificate in the Personal Certificates store, do the following:

1. Open Windows Internet Explorer.
2. On the Tools menu, click Internet Options, and then click the Content tab.
3. Click Certificates, and then click the Personal tab.

Tuesday, February 17, 2009

Microsoft Word 2003 Normal.dot file document problem

Microsoft Word has encountered a problem and needs to close. We are sorry for the inconvenience. After a document named Normal.dot is placed in the User or Workgroup templates folder and you try to start Word 2003, you may receive the error message. This behavior may occur if the global template (Normal.dot) is actually a Word document named Normal.dot. When Word attempts to use the document as its default global template, you receive the error message.

Click 'Yes' on the message that follows the error message: 'Word has detected a problem with the existing normal.dot. Would you like to create a new normal.dot?'.

A Word document (.doc) renamed with a Word template (s.dot) extension does not open in Word because template files contain a file format that is different from that of document files.

To resolve this issue:
1) Click 'Yes' on the message that follows the error message: 'Word has detected a problem with the existing normal.dot. Would you like to create a new normal.dot?'.
2) After you do this, a new Normal.dot template file is created and Word starts as expected.

I hope that It help you to fix microsoft word problems with normal.dot file.

Wednesday, February 11, 2009

How to recover a lost file in Word 2007 or in Word 2003

This post provide support for Microsoft Office Word documents can be lost in certain situations. For example, the document may be lost if an error occurs that forces Word to quit, if you experience a power interruption while you are editing, or if you close the document without saving changes.

This post discusses steps that you can use to try to recover the lost document.

Notes
• The whole document may be lost if you have not recently saved the document. If you have saved your document, you may lose only the changes that you made since the last save.
• Some lost documents may not be recoverable. Use the following methods in the order that they appear, as appropriate for your situation.
• Because there are several versions of Microsoft Windows, the following steps may be different on your computer. If they are, see your product documentation to complete these steps.

Search for the original document
1. Click Start, and then click Search.
2. Click All files and folders in Search Companion on the left side of Microsoft Windows Explorer.
3. In the All or part of the file name: box, type the file name that you want to find.
4. In the Look in box, click My Computer, and then click Search.
5. If the results pane does not contain the file, continue with the following steps to search for all Word documents.
6. In the All or part of the file name: box, type *.doc, and then click Search.

If the results pane box does not contain the file, view the Recycle Bin. To view the Recycle Bin, follow these steps:
1. On the desktop, double-click Recycle Bin.
2. On the View menu, click Details.
3. On the View menu, click Arrange Icons by, and then click Date Deleted.
4. Scroll through the files.

If you find the document that you are looking for, right-click the document, and then click Restore.
  1. This returns the document to its original location.
  2. Search for Word backup files
  3. If the Always create backup copy setting is selected, there may be a backup copy of the file.

To locate the Always create backup copy setting, perform one of the following actions:
• In Microsoft Office Word 2007, click the Microsoft Office Button, click Word Options, and then click Advanced. The Always create backup copy setting is in the Save section.
• In Microsoft Office Word 2003, click Options on the Tools menu. The Always create backup copy setting is on the Save tab.


To find the backup copy of the file, follow these steps:
1. Locate the folder where you last saved the missing file.
2. Search for files that have the .wbk extension.

If there is not a .wbk file located in the original folder, follow these steps to search the computer for any .wbk files:
a. Click Start, and then click Search.
b. Click All files and folders in Search Companion on the left side of Windows Explorer.
c. In the All or part of the file name: box, type *.wbk.
d. In the Look in box, click My Computer, and then click Search.

If you find any files that have the name 'Backup of' followed by the name of the missing file, follow these steps:
a. Start Word.
b. Perform one of the following actions:
• In Word 2007, click the Microsoft Office Button, click Open, click All Files *.* in the Files of type box, locate and select the file, and then click Open.
• In Word 2003, click Open on the File menu, click All Files *.* in the Files of type box, locate and select the file, and then click Open.

Thursday, February 5, 2009

Publish a workbook to Excel Services

If you have access to Excel Services, which is a server running Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 that is capable of running Excel Calculation Services, you can publish a workbook to that server so that other users can access all or parts of the data that it contains in a browser (browser: Software that interprets HTML files, formats them into Web pages, and displays them. A Web browser, such as Windows Internet Explorer, can follow hyperlinks, transfer files, and play sound or video files that are embedded in Web pages.) by using Microsoft Office Excel Web Access.

When you publish a workbook to Excel Services, the entire workbook is published on the server, but you can define the parts of the workbook (such as individual worksheets, named ranges, or charts) that you want Excel Services to display in Office Excel Web Access. By displaying only specific parts of the workbook and by using Office SharePoint Server 2007 permissions to help protect the workbook from unauthorized access, you can keep data in the workbook confidential while enabling authorized users to refresh, recalculate, and interact with the viewable data.

You can also define parameters. Parameters are single cells that can have their values defined by Office Excel Web Access users. You can use parameters to expose cells that can drive workbook calculation, such as a what-if analysis that is using the values that users enter in cells that are specified as parameters.

More Related Topic
Excel features that are not supported by Excel Services.
Microsoft Office Support
Excel 2003 to Excel 2007 command reference guide Microsoft Support Microsoft Office 2010 Support Microsoft Office 2013 Support

Monday, February 2, 2009

A Review of 2003 Microsoft Office

Similar to the earlier versions of Microsoft Office, the 2003 Microsoft Office is a package of software programs designed for various office work activities. The programs Excel, Word, Access, Outlook, OneNote, Visio, PowerPoint, InfoPath, FrontPage, Project, Publisher, and Live Meeting are included in the 2003 Microsoft Office. The 2003 version of Microsoft Office combines them all together under a sort of bulk rate price tag but each of these programs is also sold as a separate software product.

This version of Microsoft Office boasts a more complete package than any of the previous versions. It offers more programs, and the most up to date versions of the software available. Of course, the older versions of the Office package are still perfectly good. In fact, I’m still using the 2000 addition, and am perfectly happy with it.

You can be easily sucked into the hype over the 2003 Office deal only to discover that you didn’t really need the ‘improvements’. Like all software companies, Microsoft is update crazy. Microsoft newer versions represent an entire new product line for a minimal cost to them because they are basically the same thing as the older version.

The Microsoft Office concept is a huge success for the software giant. Just about every computers that major businesses own has a copy of 2003 Microsoft Office or some earlier version. You can do just about anything including writing form letters, tracking data, creating visual presentations, sending emails, creating graphical designs, combining text and graphical images, and arranging online meetings through 2003 Microsoft Office programs.

I use Excel, Word, and PowerPoint most of the time. Anyone who does any kind of work involving presentations, writing, and organizing data will rely heavily on these three programs. These three programs alone make the 2003 Microsoft Office package a good deal. Excel and Word are vital programs for personal use, even if you don’t work with computers because they make letter writing and tracking your finances much easier.

I highly recommend picking up 2003 Microsoft Office if you don’t have any Microsoft Office versions, and don’t even have Word, or Excel. It is available online from just about anyone, and any stores that carry computer software will have it as well. You probably don’t really need to get 2003 Microsoft Office if you already have an older Office version. You might want to get it if you do a lot of office work and are interested in the new programs that come with the package.