Microsoft Support Number OR Call Toll-Free @ 1-844-478-2887

Sunday, January 30, 2011

How to repair Microsoft Office 2010

When you have problems with any programs installed as part of the Microsoft Office 2010, then you try Microsoft Office 2010 repair option and see if that resolves the issue. To repair a Microsoft Office 2010 installed on a Windows Vista, click Start menu –> Control Panel –> Click the Programs link. Then Navigate to Programs and features and click the link. This would display the Uninstall or Change Programs window as shown below.



Navigate and highlight the Microsoft Office installed program such as Microsoft Office Home and Business 2010 (This depends on the Office software installed on your system). Click the Change button available at the top. This would display the following window with repair options



Select Repair radio option and click the Continue button. The following Configuration Progress window will be showed.



After completing the repairing process a confirmation window ill be displayed. This process would require a system reboot as well.

Related Topic:-
Microsoft Office Starter 2010 & Office 2010 Professional Beta Features Comparison
microsoft office Home And Student 2010 product key
Microsoft Office Home and Student 2010 Specifications
O

ffice 2010 Memory Requirements

Office 2010 Support

Microsoft Office 2010: A cry for help?

Pardon the melodramatic headline, but I've had this thought bouncing around my head since I first installed Office 2010 -- the subject of today's column -- about two weeks ago.

office_2010_logo_vertical.jpg

It's not just that Microsoft faces serious competitive pressure from the likes of Google, Apple, open-source developers and such startup firms as Evernote. It's not just that it's handcuffed itself to the contradiction of selling the same applications to IT professionals and to home users who barely touch its features. (Note: If you're an IT professional and feel that my reviews slight your needs, you should remember that I'm a consumer-technology columnist; that means that your problems aren't mine unless they affect what home users do on their own time.)

No, it's that a company that, until recently, was the biggest software firm in America seems incapable of shipping a clean, current, consistently functional set of programs.

The most obvious evidence of this problem is Office 2010's incoherent "co-authoring" options. While OneNote lets you keep the same document open between copies of the desktop program and its pared-down Office Web App equivalent, Word and PowerPoint only permit real-time sharing between their desktop selves (though you first have to set up that link through the Office Live site in a procedure so convoluted that I would have denounced it if I'd had more room to write). Excel 2010, meanwhile, doesn't allow any simultaneous work on a document -- but if you upload it to Office Web Apps, two Excel Web users can hack away at once on the file.

Microsoft deserves some credit for bringing even these limited features to home users, after years of reserving them for corporate users logged into its SharePoint server software. But it also deserves blame for doing so in a form most concisely described in an Excel spreadsheet.

Spending time in Office will reveal other telling details. One of my favorites is the absurd, 19-item menu Outlook 2010 offers to label a phone number you've added to a contact's listing. Your choices don't include "VoIP" or "satellite" (much less "Google Voice"), but they do feature such relics as "Car," "ISDN," "Other Fax," "Pager," and "Telex."

(Won't somebody at Microsoft please answer their StarTAC? 1987 is calling and wants its NYNEX Mobile phone back.)

office web app save dialog.jpg

Then there's the dialog at the left, which appears when you save a document to Office Web Apps, even in Windows 7. That little sideways-face icon, apparently unchanged from its debut in Windows 95, may catch your attention first. But also note the logo at the bottom advertising Microsoft's .Net Passport -- as in, the Web-login system that Microsoft renamed and scaled back in the spring of 2006.

If we ran a story that got the basic points across but was also littered with obsolete or incorrect references, you would still doubt its worth. Well, what are you supposed to think of a product with as many signs of sloppy work as Office 2010? Is somebody at Microsoft trying to say they need some time off? Or is that an illogical scenario for a company with the resources of a Microsoft? Tell me in the comments -- or stop by my Web chat, at 1 p.m. instead of the usual noon today, to discuss it in real time.

Thursday, January 27, 2011

Classic Menu for Professional 2010 Visio

One may find that the new ribbon-style interface of Microsoft Visio 2010 puts all the users who were accustomed to Microsoft Visio 2003/2007 into a fair amount of confusion. A well-designed application, Classic Menu for Microsoft Visio 2010, comes to solve the problem. The application helps bring back the classic-style of Microsoft Visio 2003 and 2007 interface with all the new features of Microsoft Visio 2010, which allows users to seamlessly switch between the two interfaces.The software allows you to work with Visio 2010 as if it were Visio 2003/2007. It shows the familiar classic menus and toolbars on the ribbon in Microsoft Visio 2010. If you were using Visio 2003/2007 before, you don't need any trainings or tutorials after upgrading to Microsoft Visio 2010 with this add-in now.All classic menu items are well displayed as a group in the tool bar of the Ribbon, while all new features and commands of Microsoft Visio 2010 are added to the classic style interface.Classic Menu for Microsoft Visio 2010 is ideal for international organizations as it supports all the languages of Microsoft Visio 2010 including English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Japanese, Dutch, Chinese, and more. It automatically shows the menus and toolbars in the language of your Microsoft Office 2010. Fully compatible with Windows 7, Windows 7 x64, Vista, Vista x64, XP, XP x64, Windows 2003 Server and 2008 Server.You can enable or disable the classic menu and toolbar in an easy way. And the Classic Menu Manage center can help you quickly configure the setting. Easy install and uninstall. Easy to show or hide tabs of Ribbon. The Visio 2010 build-in tabs and groups on the ribbon are available at all times. The Classic Menu for Microsoft Visio 2010 is very stable and strong.
The advanced diagramming tools of Visio 2010 help you simplify complexity with dynamic, data-driven visuals and new ways to share on the Web in real-time.

Start by building your diagram with professional-looking templates and modern, pre-drawn shapes. Then, easily link your diagram to popular data sources (such as Excel). You¡¯ll see data automatically refresh right within your diagram, reflected in vibrant visuals such as icons, symbols, colors, and bar graphs. Finally, with just a few clicks, publish your data-linked diagram to SharePoint, and provide access to others on the Web, even if they don¡¯t have Visio.

Together, simplicity, data-driven shapes, and Web sharing make Visio 2010 one of the most powerful ways to see and understand important information.

Visio 2010 features and benefits

Jump-start diagramming with a diverse set of pre-drawn shapes, sample drawings, and templates for IT, business, process management, and more. For any type of diagramming need, Visio can help you to get started quickly.

Easily connect your diagrams to one or more data sources including Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Access, Microsoft SQL Server, SharePoint Services, or any OLEDB (Object Linking and Embedding Database) or ODBC (Open Database Connectivity) data source using the Data Selector and Automatic Link wizards.

Display real-time data right within the shapes of your diagrams, based on conditions you define, using meaningful graphics such as color, icons, symbols, and data bars. Then, add a legend to explain the meaning of your data-linked graphics.

Windows Phone 7 and SharePoint 2010 Tips

Now that I've finally got my Windows Phone 7, I have had a little time to play around with some of the integration with SharePoint and start to understand better some of the issues and limitations I've heard described previously by other folks. I'm going to try and share some of those details here so hopefully you will be clearer on what does and does not work right now and what you can do to mitigate in certain circumstances.

First, as an aside, I must say that I am really very impressed with Windows Phone 7 (hereafter referred to as WP7). Like many folks at my current employer, I've only had a Windows Phone since they first came out, up to and including the Windows Mobile 6.5. I've had more than my share of frustrations and was getting ready to just jump ship myself here not that long ago, when I got wind of the WP7 release date. Since it was only a few months away I decided to hold out one more time and give it a try, and boy am I glad I did. To begin with, I purchased the Samsung Focus. Folks, the display on this phone is amazing - really fantastic. It's like looking at a minature high def device, the picture is so bright and clear. Kudos to Samsung on the device. The phone itself has a few annoyances as most devices do, but overall the performance and functionality is really terrific. Texting has never been easier. I've thought for the last several years that I must have disproportionately large thumbs compared to the rest of the humans because I always had so many typos in messages, which made for a long and frustrating experience creating messages. The new auto-correct feature in WP7 is really, truly amazing. I don't know who developed this stuff but I highly recommend that they start working on the next manned space launch to Mars or something because the work these guys have done is brilliant. The whole touch screen experience is also extremely fluid and easy to use - waaaayyyyy better than anything that was in Mobile 6.5. The integration with Zune is definitely cool - I've already synced a bunch of music from my PC to my phone, and the integration with XBox Live is cooler yet. It's awesome seeing my little XBox Live Avatar on my screen, as well as being able to check out my latest accomplishments, etc. And that's not even mentioning the wide array of games that I can get on my phone now (note to wife: my bill may be uncharacteristically high this month). Also, the performance is SNAPPY! It is SO much better than Mobile 6.5 in that respect. Anyways, I could go on and on but I won't, I'm not really a product reviewer but have been so impressed with this device and OS that I felt compelled to share. Now, onto the subject at hand.

The first thing I want to differentiate here is the difference in what you can do with SharePoint on WP7 in the browser, versus with the Office hub (a.k.a. SharePoint Mobile Workspace). Let's start with the browser.

Overall, most SharePoint sites work great in the WP7 browser. One thing that is kind of interesting is that even if you configure your browser in WP7 to be the mobile version vs. the desktop version, when you hit a SharePoint site it will always display the full browser version. If you want to see the mobile version of a site in SharePoint 2010 you must append the querystring "?mobile=1" to the end of your Url. Note that this is different from SharePoint 2007 where you just append a "/m" to the Url to get the mobile views; if you try and do the same thing in SharePoint 2010 it will give you a page not found error. As far as the mobile views themselves, they are definitely improved and look much nicer in 2010 than they did in 2007. Now, here's the one big funky thing to be aware of, and of course it has to do with claims web sites in SharePoint. I also need to scope my comments - in my claims sites in my lab, they are configured to authenticate with AD FS 2.0. My ADFS server is configured to use Windows authentication. Since I use the fully-qualified name of my ADFS server, the browser doesn't attempt to send my credentials automatically; instead it gives me the standard browser Windows auth prompt. Okay, so - in the WP7 browser, this does not work. I can get to the site where I select my authentication type (Windows or my SPTrustedIdentityTokenIssuer). I select SAML auth provider and it redirects me to ADFS, but at that point things fail. What I mean by "fail", is that the browser doesn't throw out that Windows authentication dialog, so I never get past the ADFS site. If you are looking at the WP7 browser it effectively looks like it's frozen, but it really isn't. Fortunately my friend Joe F. gave me a way to fix this so I will share it here. You need to go in and modify the compat.browser file. That means you need to visit every WFE, and drill down to where the compat.browser file is. By default it's in the \inetpub\wwwroot\wss\VirtualDirectories\yourVirtualDirectory\App_Browsers folder. In there you want to find the entry for the Windows Phone 7 browser agent - the user agent is Office Mobile Web Access. You want to find the isMobileDevice attribute of the capabilities element and change it from "true" to "false". That will also recycle your IIS virtual server, but now you should be able to navigate to the site in your WP7 browser. This time though when you hit the ADFS site you should get an authentication prompt in WP7 in which you can enter your credentials and continue. Again, I'm reporting the "simplest" ADFS implementation; depending on what kind of authentication you've implemented there, your mileage may vary.

Now, let's talk about the Office hub. The Office hub in WP7 is really pretty slick and a nice user experience. However...for now you are pretty limited in terms of the SharePoint sites you can hit. Folks, I'll just come out and say it, but in my testing (and this is pretty consistent with what I had heard elsewhere), you will only be able to use the Office hub on SharePoint sites that are configured to use Windows authentication and are in the equivalent of the intranet zone. For example, I have a site called http://farm2 that uses Windows claims auth and I can open it and all the documents in it just fine in Office hub. However, I also have a site called http://wcftest.vbtoys.com and it also uses Windows auth, but I cannot access it from Office hub. When I try I get an error message that says "Can't open...SharePoint doesn't support this authentication scheme." Well the real problem here is that the browser, just like IE on the desktop, sees the period (".") in the Url and that puts in in the Internet zone. Here the problem is that in the Internet zone, the Office hub does not support Windows authentication. So now I'm basically cut off from that site on my WP7.

Here's another example: in this case, I'm trying to hit a site that should be in the "Intranet" zone - the Url is https://fc1. The site is configured to use both Windows and SAML claims. Well, unfortunately the SAML claims part won't work with Office hub either. So you still get the same error message I described above. If you try a site that is only SAML auth, you hit the same problem - no entry. I thought it would be curious to see if the Office hub could re-use the FedAuth cookie from the WP7 browser, so I made the compat.browser change I described above and navigated to my SAML sites in the browser. Then I tried opening them up again in Office hub and...no joy - same error message.

Finally, for completeness, I tried a SharePoint site secured with FBA claims. The net of it is you get a slightly different error, but you still don't get in. In this case you get an error message that says "Can't open...SharePoint doesn't support non-SharePoint servers and can't open the requested content. You can try opening the content in your web browser instead." And it gives me a nice "open" button that if clicked will indeed open the SharePoint site in my browser...but not in Office hub.

So that's what I've found so far. The WP7 overall is really great, the SharePoint integration with the browser is pretty good, but with Office hub it is lacking. Hopefully though you at least know what you have to work with now and can plan accordingly and/or plug in some other authentication mechanism in-between you and site (like UAG) if you want to open up more of your sites to Office hub.

Article Source - http://bit.ly/bBDoyp

Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Using Communicator 2011 on a MacBook Pro

If this saves someone some time, it’ll all be to the good; you wouldn’t believe how much time I wasted this morning on getting it to work. Unless you fall into the small section of the population who fit under that SEO-friendly title I wouldn’t bother continuing to read.




Screen shot 2011-01-12 at 7.45.13We at DevExpress are trying to find a better way to communicate. With staff all over the world, sometimes it’s hard to keep in touch. Over the past couple of weeks or so, we’ve been evaluating Microsoft Lync 2010 (previously known as Office Communications Server or some such). It’s all fine and good if you have Windows PCs across the company, but we have — shock, horror — a few Macs. Including this 13” MacBook Pro I now use for my day-to-day work.

I haven’t abandoned Windows completely of course: I still need a way to use Visual Studio for a start, and Windows Live Writer is still the best way to publish blog posts. So I have a virtual machine set up and use VMWare Fusion to serve it up. Last week while I was in the offices in Glendale we set up the Lync Communicator program in my VM and very nice it was too. Unfortunately, I don’t as a matter of course start up the VM in the morning and have it running constantly. Indeed the opposite is usually the norm: I only start the VM when I need to use those couple of apps I only have in their Windows versions. So, all in all, a bit of a waste.

This weekend I did a bit of research to see what I could do. It turns out that most of the Google hits out there were for previous versions of Microsoft Messenger for the Mac whereas I use Office 2011. It seems with the new version of Office for the Mac, Microsoft made Messenger “personal” and restricted it to only work with Windows Live. No Lync support. Well, fooey to that.

They did, however, create a “business” version that does work with Lync and called it Microsoft Communicator for Mac 2011 (it’s currently at version 13.1.0). So, I just install that and everything will be groovy, right? Short answer: no. Long answer: .

Here’s how to do it.

1. Download Microsoft Communicator for the Mac 2011. I got mine from my MSDN subscription. I don’t think it’s available as a public download. I also don’t know if it’s part of the Microsoft Lync Server download (I’ve not been involved in the setting up of the Lync server).

2. It’s an iso file, so just mount it and install it in the usual way on your Mac. When it asks you for your login details, ignore it and cancel out.

3. Now the fun step. It seems you have to install a certificate as a root certificate on the Mac in order for Communicator to work securely (briefly: the TLS connection needs an X509 certificate to authenticate the server). Azret gave me the URI on our NAS for ours, so I just double-clicked it from within Finder. A Keychain Access dialog came up asking me if I trusted the certificate. I clicked “Always Trust”, and... nothing happened. The certificate wasn’t added. If I tried to login with Communicator (you need your email address, user id, and password), I got this:


3 bis. This is where it gets squirrely. A lot of the advice out there is for the earlier Leopard version of Mac OS X or is for earlier versions of Messenger for the Mac and talks about having to add the X509Anchors keychain to the list in the Keychain Access utility (although it’s there by default in Leopard) and then adding your company server certificate to that. Sometimes, this advice forgets to add the word “Leopard” making it seem as if it’s valid for all versions of OS X. Since the keychain by default is restricted to writing, you have to issue chmod commands and such to open it up for modification. (See here for an example of such advice, although it does talk about SnowLeopard. Here’s a TechNet article that also sent me down another rabbit hole.)

The answer for SnowLeopard is actually very simple: open Keychain Access (it’s in /Applications/Utilities, although I tend to just use Spotlight to find apps); drag the root certificate to the login keychain; on the dialog that comes up click Always Trust.

4. Start up Communicator for the Mac, type in your email address, user id, and password (I also click the remember password checkbox) and click Sign In. Communicator starts up.

5. (This one’s a bummer.) It seems that Communicator for the Mac does not use Growl for alerts but instead uses its own system. Yah. Boo. Sucks.



As you can see, I set the dock icon bounce to Continuously (the default is Once Only). That way, if I miss someone pinging me immediately, at least I have a better chance of seeing it fairly quickly. I prefer Adium’s bounce once every 5 seconds option though.

Classic Menu for InfoPath 2010

Have you tried the Microsoft InfoPath 2010? If you have spent a lot of time adjusting yourself to the Ribbon interface of Microsoft InfoPath 2010, or being frustrated by searches for new features on the Ribbon interface, here is a solution to save your time for the transition, Classic Menu for Microsoft InfoPath 2010. Classic Menu for InfoPath 2010, an Office add-in designed for Microsoft InfoPath 2010, brings the menus and toolbars of office 2003 and 2007 into the Ribbon of Microsoft InfoPath 2010, adds a ?Menus? tab at the far left of the menu bar and allows you to work with InfoPath 2010 as if it were InfoPath 2003/2007. All classic menu items of InfoPath 2003 are well displayed as a group in the tool bar of the Ribbon, while all new features and commands of Microsoft InfoPath 2010 are added to the classic style interface. The software allows you to work with InfoPath 2010 as if it were InfoPath 2003. It shows the familiar classic menus and toolbars on the ribbon in Microsoft InfoPath 2010. If you were using InfoPath 2003 before, you don't need any trainings or tutorials after upgrading to Microsoft InfoPath 2010 with this add-in now.

The software supports all languages that are supported by Microsoft InfoPath 2010: English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Japanese, Dutch, Chinese, and more. It automatically shows the menus and toolbars in the language of your Microsoft Office 2010. Fully compatible with Windows 7, Windows 7 x64, Vista, Vista x64, XP, XP x64, Windows 2003 Server and 2008 Server. You can enable or disable the classic menu and toolbar in an easy way. And the Classic Menu Manage center can help you quickly configure the setting. Easy install and uninstall. Easy to show or hide tabs of Ribbon. The InfoPath 2007 build-in tabs and groups on the ribbon are available at all times. The Classic Menu for Microsoft InfoPath 2010 is very stable and strong.

Monday, January 24, 2011

Microsoft Publisher 2010 Full Version Student & Teacher Key Features

Microsoft Publisher 2010

Microsoft Publisher 2010 helps you create, personalize, and share a wide range of professional-quality publications and marketing materials with ease. With Publisher 2010, you can easily communicate your message in a variety of publication types, saving you time and money. Whether you are creating brochures, newsletters, postcards, greeting cards, or e-mail newsletters, you can deliver high-quality results without having graphic design experience. Get the job done right the first time with Publisher 2010.

Key Features


Create visually compelling publications

* Publisher 2010 provides a broad range of new and improved tools that help you look like a design genius and create content that’s sure to impress.
* Use improved picture-editing tools—including the ability to pan, zoom, and crop your images and picture placeholders—that make it a snap to replace images while preserving the layout of your page. Easily fine-tune every picture to help your publication look its absolute best.
* Design and reorganize pages like a pro with new object alignment technology. This technology provides visual guides to help you effortlessly align and position your content, but it always leaves the final layout up to you.
Create dynamic publications in very little time when you insert and customize prebuilt building blocks of content, both built-in and from the Publisher community, directly from Publisher 2010. Choose from an array of page parts—such as sidebars and stories—as well as calendars, borders, advertisements, and more.
Give your text the appearance of expert typesetting with new OpenType typography. Publisher 2010 provides support for the ligatures, stylistic sets, and other professional typography features available in many OpenType fonts. Use built-in or custom OpenType fonts to create text as impactful as images with just a couple of clicks.

Manage your publications better with easy-to-use tools


* It’s much easier to create and manage your publications when you can work the way you want.
* The extraordinary new integrated print experience in Publisher 2010 enables you to view a full-page print preview with a host of page layout tools and adjustable print settings. The new print experience is just one of many features available from the new Microsoft Office Backstage™ view. Backstage view replaces the traditional File menu to provide a centralized, organized space for all of your publication management tasks.
* The improved, customizable Ribbon is now available in Publisher to make easily accessible the commands you need most. Create custom tabs or even customize built-in tabs. With Publisher 2010, you’re in control.

Share your publications with confidence

* When it’s time to share your publication, Publisher 2010 leaves nothing to guesswork.
* Compile, edit, and manage your customer or contacts list directly in Publisher, using the easy and efficient Mailings tab on the Publisher 2010 Ribbon.
* Access the Design Checker from the new Backstage view to automatically review your publication for many common errors before you share it. Get options for fixing them quickly and easily. Then, return to Backstage view when the publication is ready to go and save it to whatever format you need for easy sharing—from PDF or XPS to a range of image formats, such as JPEG or PNG.
* Whether you’re working on your monthly newsletter, designing a new postcard, creating greeting cards, or developing a marketing campaign for your business, Publisher 2010 helps you create the content you need more quickly, with more flexibility, and with better results.

Microsoft Publisher 2010 Full Version Student & Teacher Key Features

Microsoft Publisher 2010

Microsoft Publisher 2010 helps you create, personalize, and share a wide range of professional-quality publications and marketing materials with ease. With Publisher 2010, you can easily communicate your message in a variety of publication types, saving you time and money. Whether you are creating brochures, newsletters, postcards, greeting cards, or e-mail newsletters, you can deliver high-quality results without having graphic design experience. Get the job done right the first time with Publisher 2010.





Key Features


Create visually compelling publications

* Publisher 2010 provides a broad range of new and improved tools that help you look like a design genius and create content that’s sure to impress.
* Use improved picture-editing tools—including the ability to pan, zoom, and crop your images and picture placeholders—that make it a snap to replace images while preserving the layout of your page. Easily fine-tune every picture to help your publication look its absolute best.
* Design and reorganize pages like a pro with new object alignment technology. This technology provides visual guides to help you effortlessly align and position your content, but it always leaves the final layout up to you.
Create dynamic publications in very little time when you insert and customize prebuilt building blocks of content, both built-in and from the Publisher community, directly from Publisher 2010. Choose from an array of page parts—such as sidebars and stories—as well as calendars, borders, advertisements, and more.
Give your text the appearance of expert typesetting with new OpenType typography. Publisher 2010 provides support for the ligatures, stylistic sets, and other professional typography features available in many OpenType fonts. Use built-in or custom OpenType fonts to create text as impactful as images with just a couple of clicks.

Manage your publications better with easy-to-use tools


* It’s much easier to create and manage your publications when you can work the way you want.
* The extraordinary new integrated print experience in Publisher 2010 enables you to view a full-page print preview with a host of page layout tools and adjustable print settings. The new print experience is just one of many features available from the new Microsoft Office Backstage™ view. Backstage view replaces the traditional File menu to provide a centralized, organized space for all of your publication management tasks.
* The improved, customizable Ribbon is now available in Publisher to make easily accessible the commands you need most. Create custom tabs or even customize built-in tabs. With Publisher 2010, you’re in control.

Share your publications with confidence

* When it’s time to share your publication, Publisher 2010 leaves nothing to guesswork.
* Compile, edit, and manage your customer or contacts list directly in Publisher, using the easy and efficient Mailings tab on the Publisher 2010 Ribbon.
* Access the Design Checker from the new Backstage view to automatically review your publication for many common errors before you share it. Get options for fixing them quickly and easily. Then, return to Backstage view when the publication is ready to go and save it to whatever format you need for easy sharing—from PDF or XPS to a range of image formats, such as JPEG or PNG.
* Whether you’re working on your monthly newsletter, designing a new postcard, creating greeting cards, or developing a marketing campaign for your business, Publisher 2010 helps you create the content you need more quickly, with more flexibility, and with better results.

Computer Requirements

Computer and processor 500 MHz or higher
Memory 256 MB
Hard disk 1.5 GB
Drive DVD drive
Display 1024x576 or higher resolution monitor
Operating system Windows 7, Windows Vista with SP 1, Windows XP with SP3 (32-bit), Windows Server 2003 R2 with MSXML 6.0 (32-bit Office only), Windows Server 2008, or later 32- or 64-bit OS.

Access 2010 And SharePoint

Now that we can talk about all the features in Access 2010 I think I have to place my marker immediately on what I believe is the BIG story in this release.

For the past 3 or so years I have kept hearing internally at MS about the Web story in what became Access 2010. The idea seemed to be that in order to sustain a future for Access it was necessary to “tie its can” to SharePoint’s bumper and offer itself as a somewhat functional database tool for lists and relatively small data requirements inside SharePoint. I always had trouble with that idea because I was concerned that by doing so they would marginalize the very community that Access needs to survive, namely the worldwide non-network of people using client-side Access (often secretly) to produce Departmental Solutions.

But nonetheless I jumped on the bandwagon a couple of years ago. Reading the writing on the wall I stuck my neck out and developed a serious application using Client-Side Access 2007 with SharePoint 2007 Lists as the backend. And it worked !!! In fact that application has been in production for over a year, and with a little help from Terminal Services for those users spread around the world (literally), this application has worked and worked well (despite the kludges I had to employ to get everything to work well).

But in the background of all of this was with the expectation that Access 2010 would provide a far better story. Well it’s true !! But not in the way many expected.

Welcome To The Hybrid Access Application

While a lot of the talk will revolve around the pure Web-story in Access 2010 I believe that is not the REAL story – and any effort to make that the real story would be misguided.

The conception of the Access 2010 Client – SharePoint 2010 Server integration is not only brilliant it was also very, very ballsy. I cannot imagine a bigger leap of faith than what they did. That is the REAL story of Access 2010 and Access Services.

In the end Access 2010 allows the traditional client-side Access developer to stage their entire application inside SharePoint on a Subsite created by Access Services. When an Access application is “Published” to SharePoint all objects (tables, queries, forms, reports, etc.) get stored inside the SharePoint subsite.

The user needs only a small (200+ bytes) shortcut to subsequently launch this application from SP. But wait – the first time a user launches the application, Access Services reconstitutes (they use the cute word “Re-Hydate” at MS) in a folder on their client machine C: drive in binary format (not XML). Then Access launches THAT version locally. But while the data is cached on the local machine (again in binary format) this data is directly synched to the actual tables INSIDE SHAREPOINT.

Yes – the data, although cached locally, is synched in real time – BOUND – to the actual live tables inside the SharePoint site. Any changes to data is instantly synched with the Server version. So the user gets the benefit of using a cached client-side version of the full-featured client Access application but the data is natively staored on a SharePoint server.

Next time the user launches the application, Access Services synchronizes the local cached version with the SharePoint site and only takes action on objects and data that might have been changed since the last visit to the site. Therefore in most cases subsequent launches will be close to as fast as when using a local version of the data.

At the same time the developer (or developers by the way) can make changes to the application both front and back and then Synch their changes to the Server. Subsequent visits to the application by users will then automatically drive those changes to their local cached version to keep them in synch as well. No more re-deployment hassle !!

In order to even more enhance the performance of the client app, Access Services has its own special caching mechanism ON THE SERVER that works in conjunction with the local cache while the user is in the application. It is my hope that this will allow client-side Access applications to operate across a worldwide Intranet EVEN using only a VPN connection. If that is the case (and it is something I have not been able to confirm yet), then suddenly we have the ability to deliver Access applications to anywhere across a corporate Intranet with total real-time concurrency and performance that will be more than acceptable (especially when one considers the distances involved). Getting access to Terminal Services or Citrix is a pretty easy process in most Corporations anyway if necessary.

Certainly an existing Access application cannot be Published to SharePoint Server without a few changes. Indexes, relationships, lookups, primary keys will all have to be changed but these requirements will be easily defined and the Compatability Wizard in Access is a BIG help for that. The pain is minimal and is all manageable (nothing is ever totally FREE in life anyway :-) ).

One important point is that IF the application is actually backended on SQL Server, those links can be preserved and the application can live on SharePoint without even using Access Services tables on the Subsite. But having the application live and be deployed through SharePoint using Access Services will still be the way to go. In fact applications that started as Access MDB or ACCDB backends can migrate to SharePoint Tables and then up to SQL Server tables as demand requires …. all that with virtually no changes to the Front-End objects of the database. Think about that one……

In the end Access 2010 provides the existing Access developer with a path upwards to the wonderful Browser-based world without giving up any of the capabilities of the Client version of Access. In effect what we are looking at here is what I would have to call a true “Client-Server” scenario – one that truly puts the processing and the objects always in their proper place to produce the best results – how often have we really seen that?

Access 2010 And SharePoint

Now that we can talk about all the features in Access 2010 I think I have to place my marker immediately on what I believe is the BIG story in this release.

For the past 3 or so years I have kept hearing internally at MS about the Web story in what became Access 2010. The idea seemed to be that in order to sustain a future for Access it was necessary to “tie its can” to SharePoint’s bumper and offer itself as a somewhat functional database tool for lists and relatively small data requirements inside SharePoint. I always had trouble with that idea because I was concerned that by doing so they would marginalize the very community that Access needs to survive, namely the worldwide non-network of people using client-side Access (often secretly) to produce Departmental Solutions.

But nonetheless I jumped on the bandwagon a couple of years ago. Reading the writing on the wall I stuck my neck out and developed a serious application using Client-Side Access 2007 with SharePoint 2007 Lists as the backend. And it worked !!! In fact that application has been in production for over a year, and with a little help from Terminal Services for those users spread around the world (literally), this application has worked and worked well (despite the kludges I had to employ to get everything to work well).

But in the background of all of this was with the expectation that Access 2010 would provide a far better story. Well it’s true !! But not in the way many expected.

Welcome To The Hybrid Access Application

While a lot of the talk will revolve around the pure Web-story in Access 2010 I believe that is not the REAL story – and any effort to make that the real story would be misguided.

The conception of the Access 2010 Client – SharePoint 2010 Server integration is not only brilliant it was also very, very ballsy. I cannot imagine a bigger leap of faith than what they did. That is the REAL story of Access 2010 and Access Services.

In the end Access 2010 allows the traditional client-side Access developer to stage their entire application inside SharePoint on a Subsite created by Access Services. When an Access application is “Published” to SharePoint all objects (tables, queries, forms, reports, etc.) get stored inside the SharePoint subsite.

The user needs only a small (200+ bytes) shortcut to subsequently launch this application from SP. But wait – the first time a user launches the application, Access Services reconstitutes (they use the cute word “Re-Hydate” at MS) in a folder on their client machine C: drive in binary format (not XML). Then Access launches THAT version locally. But while the data is cached on the local machine (again in binary format) this data is directly synched to the actual tables INSIDE SHAREPOINT.

Yes – the data, although cached locally, is synched in real time – BOUND – to the actual live tables inside the SharePoint site. Any changes to data is instantly synched with the Server version. So the user gets the benefit of using a cached client-side version of the full-featured client Access application but the data is natively staored on a SharePoint server.

Next time the user launches the application, Access Services synchronizes the local cached version with the SharePoint site and only takes action on objects and data that might have been changed since the last visit to the site. Therefore in most cases subsequent launches will be close to as fast as when using a local version of the data.

At the same time the developer (or developers by the way) can make changes to the application both front and back and then Synch their changes to the Server. Subsequent visits to the application by users will then automatically drive those changes to their local cached version to keep them in synch as well. No more re-deployment hassle !!

In order to even more enhance the performance of the client app, Access Services has its own special caching mechanism ON THE SERVER that works in conjunction with the local cache while the user is in the application. It is my hope that this will allow client-side Access applications to operate across a worldwide Intranet EVEN using only a VPN connection. If that is the case (and it is something I have not been able to confirm yet), then suddenly we have the ability to deliver Access applications to anywhere across a corporate Intranet with total real-time concurrency and performance that will be more than acceptable (especially when one considers the distances involved). Getting access to Terminal Services or Citrix is a pretty easy process in most Corporations anyway if necessary.

Certainly an existing Access application cannot be Published to SharePoint Server without a few changes. Indexes, relationships, lookups, primary keys will all have to be changed but these requirements will be easily defined and the Compatability Wizard in Access is a BIG help for that. The pain is minimal and is all manageable (nothing is ever totally FREE in life anyway :-) ).

One important point is that IF the application is actually backended on SQL Server, those links can be preserved and the application can live on SharePoint without even using Access Services tables on the Subsite. But having the application live and be deployed through SharePoint using Access Services will still be the way to go. In fact applications that started as Access MDB or ACCDB backends can migrate to SharePoint Tables and then up to SQL Server tables as demand requires …. all that with virtually no changes to the Front-End objects of the database. Think about that one……

In the end Access 2010 provides the existing Access developer with a path upwards to the wonderful Browser-based world without giving up any of the capabilities of the Client version of Access. In effect what we are looking at here is what I would have to call a true “Client-Server” scenario – one that truly puts the processing and the objects always in their proper place to produce the best results – how often have we really seen that?

Sunday, January 23, 2011

8 essential Microsoft OneNote tips

Everyone should be using OneNote. The note-taking application lets you dump the contents of your brain, meetings and creative sessions, and then organise and search them after the event.
If you've never tried it, you're missing out. Here's how to get the most from it with our handy OneNote tips.





1. Tag and link to Outlook
You can apply tags to your notes to help categorise and find them later. Right-click in a note and choose 'Tag', followed by the tag you want to use.
You can edit existing tags and create new ones by choosing 'Customise Tags'. Select a tag to change and click 'Modify Tag'. Type the new name and set the font and highlight colour from the dropdown lists. You can also choose a symbol from a list of dozens to go with the tag.

2. Use OCR

You can drag and drop picture files onto your OneNote notes to embed the image there. If the picture includes text, it's easy to make it searchable using OneNote's OCR capabilities.
Right-click the image and choose 'Make Text In Image Searchable', then select the language the text is in from the list. If you need to use the text in a different program or just in a different note, right-click the image and choose 'Copy Text From Picture'. You can paste the plain text wherever you like. Use this with photos of text or scanned pages.

3. Search instantly


You can search your notebooks using the bar to the right of your notebook, above the page tabs. Enter your search terms to see suggested results and select one to jump directly to it.

To search on a current page of notes, press [Ctrl]+[F] and enter your search terms. Matching words will be highlighted for you. In OneNote 2007, you can install Instant Search by choosing 'Tools | Options | Other' and clicking 'Install Instant Search'.

4. Edit page tabs and sections
By default, page tabs appear on the right of your notebooks, but you can move these to the left to make them more accessible if you're left-handed. In OneNote 2007, choose 'Tools | Options | Display' and select 'Page tabs appear on the left'.
In OneNote 2010, choose 'File | Options | Display | Page tabs appear on the left'. Shrink the page tabs to create more room by clicking the 'Collapse Page Tabs' arrow to the side of the page tabs. To hide the tabs and section headings for a bit more space, press [F11].

5. Record sound notes
You can record sound notes that include quick memos or longer recordings of meetings or lectures. Put the cursor at the point in your notes that you want to store the recording and click the 'Record Audio Only' button on the toolbar.
In OneNote 2010, choose 'Insert | Record Audio'. The recording starts immediately and continues until you press the 'Stop' button on the audio recording toolbar, or the Playback tab on the ribbon. Click 'Play' to play the audio back. You can also drag and drop sound or video files onto notes.

6. Add hyperlinks

In OneNote, you can create hyperlinks that link between different parts of your notes to make them easier to navigate, and to help you understand the connections within the information you're handling.

To insert a hyperlink, open the section containing the page you want to link to, right-click the Page tab of that page in the margin and choose 'Copy Hyperlink to the Page'. Now go to the place where you want to insert the link and then paste it in place.

You can copy and paste hyperlinks to different sections of a notebook, or to notebooks themselves. Hyperlinks can also be used to link to web pages, email addresses and other files stored on your PC.

7. Go mobile

If you have a Windows Mobile-based smartphone, you can install OneNote Mobile to sync notes between your phone and computer. OneNote 2010 includes links to cloud storage, so the mobile app can edit these notes, ready for them to be replicated at your PC, without requiring synchronising. OneNote 2007 relies on synchronising using Microsoft ActiveSync.

To install OneNote Mobile 2007 from OneNote, choose 'Tools | Options | OneNote Mobile | Install OneNote Mobile'. If you use OneNote 2010, you can also use the Web app to access a notebook from any PC connected to the web, even if it doesn't have OneNote installed.

8. Protect your privacy
You can password protect sections of notes to keep them confidential. Right-click the section tab you want to protect and choose 'Password Protect This Section'. Click 'Set Password' and then provide a password and confirm it.
Make a secure note of it, because OneNote won't be able to recover notes that are protected by a long-forgotten password. Once the password has been set, click 'Lock All' or press [Ctrl]+[Alt]+[L] to lock the section. You now need to provide the password before you can read or modify any of the notes in this section.

List Of Microsoft Outlook 2010 Shortcut Keys

Shortcut keys may consist of one key or combination of two or more keys that offer users an easier way to interact with computer applications without the need to use a mouse or other pointing device to perform the operation. The users who are familiar with shortcut keys can improve their productivity and speed up their works. Like other software (e.g. Windows 7 keyboard shortcuts), the Microsoft Outlook 2010 is also includes a lot of shortcut keys that make it easier for users to work around with menus and other command.





Here’s the list of Microsoft Outlook 2010 keyboard shortcuts or accelerator hotkeys that are available on the application:


* CTRL+1: Switch to Mail.
* CTRL+2: Switch to Calendar.
* CTRL+3: Switch to Contacts.
* CTRL+4: Switch to Tasks.
* CTRL+5: Switch to Notes.
* CTRL+6: Switch to Folder List in Navigation Pane.
* CTRL+7: Switch to Shortcuts.
* CTRL+PERIOD: Switch to next message (with message open).
* CTRL+COMMA: Switch to previous message (with message open).
* CTRL+SHIFT+TAB or SHIFT+TAB: Move between the Navigation Pane, the main Outlook window, the Reading Pane, and the To-Do Bar.
* CTRL+TAB: Move around message header lines in the Navigation Pane or an open message.
* Arrow keys: Move around within the Navigation Pane.
* ALT+B or ALT+LEFT ARROW: Go back to previous view in main Outlook window.
* CTRL+Y: Go to a different folder.
* F3 or CTRL+E: Go to the Search box.
* ALT+UP ARROW or CTRL+COMMA or ALT+PAGE UP: In the Reading Pane, go to the previous message.
* SPACEBAR: In the Reading Pane, page down through text.
* SHIFT+SPACEBAR: In the Reading Pane, page up through text.
* ALT+RIGHT ARROW: Go forward to next view in main Outlook window.
* CTRL+SHIFT+I: Switch to Inbox.
* CTRL+SHIFT+O: Switch to Outbox.
* CTRL+K: Check names.
* ALT+S: Send.
* CTRL+R: Reply to a message.
* CTRL+SHIFT+R: Reply all to a message.
* CTRL+ALT+R: Reply with meeting request.
* CTRL+F: Forward a message.
* CTRL+ ALT+J: Mark a message as not junk.
* CTRL+SHIFT+I: Display blocked external content (in a message).
* CTRL+ SHIFT+S: Post to a folder.
* CTRL+SHIFT+N: Apply Normal style.
* CTRL+M or F9: Check for new messages.
* UP ARROW: Go to the previous message.
* DOWN ARROW: Go to the next message.
* CTRL+N: Create a message (when in Mail).
* CTRL+SHIFT+M: Create a message (from any Outlook view).
* CTRL+O: Open a received message.
* CTRL+SHIFT+D: Delete and Ignore a Conversation.
* CTRL+SHIFT+B: Open the Address Book.
* INSERT: Add a Quick Flag to an unopened message.
* CTRL+SHIFT+G: Display the Flag for Follow Up dialog box.
* CTRL+Q: Mark as read.
* CTRL+U: Mark as unread.
* CTRL+SHIFT+W: Open the Mail Tip in the selected message.
* ALT+ENTER: Show the properties for the selected item.
* CTRL+SHIFT+U: Create a multimedia message.
* CTRL+SHIFT+T: Create a text message.
* CTRL+ALT+M: Mark for Download.
* CTRL+ALT+U: Clear Mark for Download.
* F9: Send and Receive.
* CTRL+B (when a Send/Receive is in progress): Display Send/Receive progress.
* CTRL+SHIFT+D: Dial a new call.
* F3 or CTRL+E: Find a contact or other item (Search).
* F11: Enter a name in the Search Address Books box.
* SHIFT+letter: In Table or List view of contacts, go to first contact that starts with a specific letter.
* F5: Update a list of distribution list members.
* CTRL+Y: Go to a different folder.
* CTRL+SHIFT+B: Open the Address Book.
* CTRL+SHIFT+F: Use Advanced Find.
* CTRL+SHIFT+PERIOD: In an open contact, open the next contact listed.
* F11: Find a contact.
* ESC: Close a contact.
* CTRL+SHIFT+X: Send a fax to the selected contact.
* CTRL+N: Create a new appointment (when in Calendar).
* CTRL+SHIFT+A: Create a new appointment (in any Outlook view).
* CTRL+SHIFT+Q: Create a new meeting request.
* CTRL+F: Forward an appointment or meeting.
* CTRL+R: Reply to a meeting request with a message.
* CTRL+SHIFT+R: Reply All to a meeting request with a message.
* ALT+0: Show 10 days in the calendar.
* ALT+1: Show 1 day in the calendar.
* ALT+2: Show 2 days in the calendar.
* ALT+3: Show 3 days in the calendar.
* ALT+4: Show 4 days in the calendar.
* ALT+5: Show 5 days in the calendar.
* ALT+6: Show 6 days in the calendar.
* ALT+7: Show 7 days in the calendar.
* ALT+8: Show 8 days in the calendar.
* ALT+9: Show 9 days in the calendar.
* CTRL+G: Go to a date.
* ALT+= or CTRL+ALT+4: Switch to Month view.
* CTRL+RIGHT ARROW: Go to the next day.
* ALT+DOWN ARROW: Go to the next week.
* ALT+PAGE DOWN: Go to the next month.
* CTRL+LEFT ARROW: Go to the previous day.
* ALT+UP ARROW: Go to the previous week.
* ALT+PAGE UP: Go to the previous month.
* ALT+HOME: Go to the start of the week.
* ALT+END: Go to the end of the week.
* ALT+MINUS SIGN or CTRL+ALT+3: Switch to Full Week view.
* CTRL+A: Select all contacts.
* CTRL+F: Create a message with selected contact as subject.
* CTRL+J: Create a Journal entry for the selected contact.
* CTRL+N: Create a new contact (when in Contacts).
* CTRL+SHIFT+C: Create a new contact (from any Outlook view).
* CTRL+O: Open a contact form for the selected contact.
* CTRL+SHIFT+L: Create a distribution list.
* CTRL+P: Print.
* CTRL+ALT+2: Switch to Work Week view.
* CTRL+COMMA or CTRL+SHIFT+COMMA: Go to previous appointment.
* CTRL+PERIOD or CTRL+SHIFT+PERIOD: Go to next appointment.
* CTRL+E: Find a message or other item.
* ESC: Clear the search results.
* CTRL+ALT+A: Expand the search to include All Mail Items, All Calendar Items, or All Contact Items, depending on the module you are in.
* CTRL+SHIFT+F: Use Advanced Find.
* CTRL+SHIFT+P: Create a new Search Folder.
* F4: Search for text within an open item.
* CTRL+H: Find and replace text, symbols, or some formatting commands. Works in the Reading Pane on an open item.
* CTRL+ALT+K: Expand search to include items from the current folder.
* CTRL+ALT+Z: Expand search to include subfolders.

Wednesday, January 19, 2011

Improvements in PowerPoint 2010

Basic presentation treatment

At the first sight the basic tools in the Home bookmark are exactly the same as in the previous PowerPoint version. Upon closer inspection you might find some new items in the SmartArt shape offer, as in other MS Office 2010 programs.
The button for slide removal in the Slides section was replaced by the new Section drop-down button. That is to say that PowerPoint 2010 offers grouping of slides into logical sections for easier navigation.






I must also mention the live view for objects inserted from clipboard and the modified appearance of the context offer and of the panel that appears at elements that have been inserted into the slide.


Inserting content in PowerPoint 2010


I am not sure whether you will appreciate the possibility to capture screenshots in Excel and Word, but I find their use in PowerPoint 2010 and the possibility to insert them into a presentation slide quite useful. Directly in the offer under the Screenshot button you will find previews of other windows so that you are just one click away from inserting their image into the presentation. Using the Screen Clipping function you can crop any part of the picture.



Just like in Excel 2010, you will find separate buttons for inserting symbols and mathematical formulas. Like the other applications, PowerPoint 2010 offers improved editing of inserted images, such as background removal, cropping into shapes and ratios, image layout, new effects etc.


Presentation appearance preview


Nothing has changed in a way individual slides are designed. In PowerPoint 2010 you will find the same functions with the same looks as in its predecessor, PowerPoint 2007.

Transitions between slides

On the contrary, the separate Transitions card is brand new. It serves to the very purpose its name suggests. It allows you to define transitions between individual presentation slides. Before you could do this using the Animations card. PowerPoint 2010 is more detailed in this respect.



Slide animation in PowerPoint 2010

The reason why a separate bookmark for transitions had to be created is that there are many new functions on the Animations card. Individual slide elements can be easily animated independently This was of course also possible before, but now you can use many new animation types and, above all, they are much easier to work with. Concerning animations, PowerPoint 2010 is not limited to a single inconspicuous drop-down offer as its predecessor was.




Using the Animation Painter tool you can easily copy animations from one object to another.

Presentation in PowerPoint 2010

Slideshows will be easier to show as well. PowerPoint 2010 supports the Broadcast Slide Show that allows you to remotely upload the presentation into a service waiting at a given web address. Viewers will be able to watch the presentation using their web browser.


When showing the presentation, there are several daintinesses that I like – they allow you to check whether you want to use the timing, play dubbed commentary or show the presentation’s control panel.

Review and View

On the Review card you will again find newly separated buttons for translating the chosen text into different languages and, above all, the card offers extended possibilities of tracking changes. Where PowerPoint 2007 provided only inserting comments, PowerPoint 2010 offers a whole revision system complete with rejecting, approving and comparing, as we know it from other MS Office applications.


The last card, View, changes the offer of slide views. Instead of the Presentation button you will find a Reading View button that launches the presentation, only it is not in a full screen mode – it fits into the current PowerPoint window.

Video editing in PowerPoint 2010

The possibility to edit video inserted into a slide directly in PowerPoint is a total newcomer. As soon as you insert and highlight the video, new Format and Edit cards appear that replace the previous Format and Options cards. It is not only the name that changes. You can cut out unnecessary parts of the video, add fading or bookmarks – all that directly from PowerPoint. You can also choose whether you want the saved video to have the controls visible or not.


Further improvements in PowerPoint 2010
• New Office themes
• Printing of notes
• Consultancy by Duarte Design – not exactly specified, will appear in the final version
• Co-operation of more author at once
• Exporting presentations into video files
• Easier sharing and Office Communicator 2007 R2 support
• PowerPoint Web App – web form of the application

Monday, January 17, 2011

How-To Use Word 2010 As a Blog Editor

When friends ask me about How-To start a blog, my standard answer is 1: WordPress and 2: Windows Live Writer. I explain that Windows Live Writer is like Microsoft Word for blogging. I was thinking about those conversation when I discovered back in Word 2007 that you could actually blog using Word. Although in 2007, the features weren’t very good so I never talked about them however, with the release of Microsoft Office 2010 and Word 2010 the blogging features built into Word are actually pretty good. Let’s take a look shall we!
Step 1.a – Start A New Blog Post

Open Word 2010. Click the File ribbon and then Select New > Blog post.



Step 1.b – Convert A Word Document To A Blog Post

Alternatively you can convert any Word document into Blog format by choosing:
File > Save & Send > Publish as Blog Post > Publish Blog Post

The document won’t be published immediately, but instead will transfer to a Blog wordpad where you can preview and make changes.



Step 2 – Write

Write your blog post. Word 2010 has a huge variety of tools for writing web posts, this allows you to really take command of your content. Be sure to save often or enable Office 2010’s AutoRecover features so that you won’t lose work in case of an accidental computer crash.



Step 3 – Connect Word To Your Blog

Under the Blog Post ribbon, Click Manage Accounts.



Step 4

In the Blog Accounts dialog that appears, Click New.
Another pop-up should appear. Select your blog provider* from the drop-down list and then Click Next.
*WordPress refers to websites running the WordPress blogging software, but it will also work for blogs hosted on wordpress.com



Step 5

In the next window you’ll be required to Enter your Blog Account’s User Name and Password. This screen will vary depending on which service your blog is hosted by. If you want to avoid A LOT of annoying password screens be sure to Check the Remember Password box.

Considering how popular WordPress is, below is an example of how to set it up with WordPress. If for some reason you have trouble connecting, you may need to locate the URL of your xmlrpc.php file. If WordPress was installed on the root of your site, just enter your domain name in the indicated area. Be sure to leave xmlrpc.php at the end of the path!

Example: http://www.mywebsite.com/wordpress/xmlrpc.php



Step 6

Was your site/blog added successfully? If so it should display on the list of Blog Accounts.
You can add as many as you like to this list and choose which one you would like to be your default.



Step 7 – Publish or Upload

In the Blog Post ribbon you will find the Publish button. If you Click the down arrow below it you’ll be given two options:
• Publish – You can post your blog article directly onto your site for all of your readers to see.
• Publish as Draft – This will only upload the article to your blog’s online queue with Draft status. It can be posted later from your online blog interface and it can also be downloaded back down to word if you don’t save your Blog document.



Step 8 – Manage And Edit Existing Blog Posts

On the Blog Post ribbon you can Click Open Existing to download a list of posts that are currently uploaded and existing on your online Blog archive. You can then choose an individual article and download it to edit or publish an existing uploaded draft.

Step 9 – Edit Articles

Editing existing Blog posts is just like writing new ones. The only difference is that there will be a yellow bar above the post stating when it was published. There will also be a category bar if you assigned a category to it.



Conclusion

Microsoft Word 2010 is a groovy tool for writing and editing Blog Posts across several different blogging platforms. It has a great spell-checker and a variety of useful formatting tools and effects to really add some depth to your articles. Despite all of the features Word has however, the Windows Live Writer team still outshines Word when it comes to blogging not to mention the Windows Live Writer is FREE and Word is not.

Like my father always said, use the right tool for the job. Don’t use a saw to drive a nail in a board. So if you want to blog, use Life Writer. If your in a pinch however and need to update a blog post or get something out quickly, use Word 2010.

10 Reasons Office 2010 Upgrade

1. Overall new features and improvements

Office 2010 comes packed with small upgrades that, put together make it stand out heads and shoulders over the old office 2007 suite AND it’s competitors.
Here’s just a few examples:
• Real-Time Co-authoring of documents allows for quick collaboration in.
• Improved Outlook conversation and calendar management tools.
• Outlook 2010 Social connector will be useful for networking online once more plug-ins are available.
• The Outlook Hotmail connector allows you to use Hotmail like an exchange server.
• Improved data visualization in Excel and Sparklines.
• PowerPoint comes packed with new audo and video tools, you can even embed videos.
• New ribbon provides a blend of old-school (File View) and new Office 2007 style ribbon provides universal ease of access across all Office applications.
• OneNote allows side notes, print server, and saves almost anything for later use.
• Rich media photo and video capture and editing including special effects and groovy styles.
• Built-in PDF support (finally)

2. Rock-solid offline support


Microsoft has kept its title as the Office desktop champ and it doesn’t plan on losing any time soon. Free and paid alternatives such as OpenOffice and Apple’s iWork have popped up on the grid but they just don’t have the tools to compete with Office 2010 in a corporate environment. If you aren’t able to maintain a 24/7 internet connection -or simply don’t want to be required to- then Office 2010 is the #1 Draft pick.


3. Where is the competition?


Google Docs and Zoho are both notable pieces of work as is Open Office however all of them are doing just 1 thing – Imitating the real deal, Office 2010. As free services, they have their place as does the Free Microsoft Solution Office Live Web Apps. That being said, they remain light years away from competing on the same level as the desktop version of the Office Suite including Office 2010.

4. Improvements to the ribbon

In Office 2007, Microsoft created an entirely new interface to its Office Suite. Some found it awkward some loved it but overall, most grew to tolerate it. The new ribbon in Office 2010 has all of what we used to love (A File Menu Tab!!!) as well as a continued refinement one the Office 2007 Ribbon. The result, the annoying Office Orb is gone and we now have a clean and effective Office Ribbon.





5. Skydrive integration


Dropbox and Google Docs might offer online storage, but Microsoft gives you 25 GB of it for free with SkyDrive. With Office 2010, Microsoft finally completed the puzzle by adding full integration between the Desktop Office Suite and their "Cloud" Microsoft Live Suite. Built right into the File, Save & Send ribbon features you can upload/save/share your documents directly to your SkyDrive account with a max upload size of 50 Megs. Not bad.




6. Live Office Web Apps

As Office 2010 hits a store near you, Microsoft released Word, Excel, Powerpoint and Onenote to the cloud (Windows Live Platform). They are all free, online, and they integrate with your local OS, Browser and Office 2010 all seamlessly. Using the Live Office web apps you can edit documents on the fly and easily share them with anyone all for no charge.




7. Crashed document retrieval and AutoRecover

In the past, losing documents to crashes has been one of my biggest complaints about the office suite. Although previous versions of Office included AutoRecover, Office 2010 improved upon it. Office 2010 helps prevent data loss from application crashes and it even works when you accidently close a document and forget to save. To go along with AutoRecover, Microsoft also rolled out a new version picker that lets you roll back to earlier edits of your documents similar to the way Google Docs and SharePoint lets you select revisions



8. Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2010 Support

If you want to use SharePoint 2010 to it’s full ability you’ll need Office 2010. But what’s so great about SharePoint 2010? The new SharePoint has many new features and it’s all 64-bit and only runs on Server 2008. Here’s the highlights of what’s new:
• FAST search provides high end scalability for content processing.
• Tagging feature, authoring, wiki’s, and other collaboration tools.
• Works in all browsers, you’re not stuck with IE anymore.
• An new easy to use interface based off of the familiar Office ribbon.




9. Protects inboxes from malicious attacks, so your organization (and contacts) can rest easier.

Office 2010 offers a Protected View enhancement to suppress malware in your e-mail attachments and Internet files. It also protects Word, PowerPoint, and Excel documents. Documents downloaded from unknown internet sources will automatically be opened in Protected View.



10. Price, it costs less than 2007.

When Office 2007 launched, the prices were a lot higher than they are now for 2010. In November of 2006 you were expected to pay $680.00 for Office 2007 Ultimate or $539.00 for the upgrade version. The only thing was, nobody was buying the upgrade version. The only time home users ever seemed to upgrade to a new version of Office was when they bought a new computer. Retail stores picked up on this and seemingly ceased carrying the upgrade version since they could just sell out the full package.
The good news is Microsoft has taken note of this too, so they’ve killed off the upgrade program and lowered the prices. You can pick up a brand new Office 2010 Professional suite (Ultimate equivalent) for $499.99. But to replace the upgrade program they now have a new keycard program. If you purchase a new PC that comes with Office 2010 software pre-packaged on it you are eligible for a keycard purchase and you can pick up keycards at retail stores and some online distributors. Office 2010 Professional via Keycard goes for $399.99, so a $100 discount isn’t too shabby.

Conclusion

Over the past 6 months that I’ve been playing with Office 2010 I have to admit it’s been rock solid. MrGroove had a few problems with Outlook Crashing at work due to weird emails however once he fixed that problem, it has been smooth as silk. The new features combined with the great new look definitely confirms its spot as the king of the desktop business/home productivity suite. It’s more expensive than some of the competitors out there but I have to admit, you really are getting what you pay for with this one.

Related Topic:-
Microsoft Office Starter 2010 & Office 2010 Professional Beta Features Comparison
microsoft office Home And Student 2010 product key
Microsoft Office Home and Student 2010 Specifications
O

ffice 2010 Memory Requirements

Office 2010 Support

Sunday, January 16, 2011

Microsoft Visio Premium 2010



Microsoft Visio Premium 2010 takes diagramming to a bold new level with dynamic, data-driven visualization tools and templates, powerful process-management features, and advanced sharing capabilities through the Web. Bring the big-picture and real-time data from multiple sources, including Microsoft Excel 2010 and Microsoft SQL Server, together in one powerful diagram with vibrant graphics such as icons, colors, and data bars. Manage your processes with sub processes and rules and logic validation to ensure accuracy and consistency across the organization. Using Microsoft SharePoint Server 2010, you can create SharePoint workflows and export them for execution and real-time

Visio 2010 is a graphical and drawing application that helps you to visualize, explore, and communicate complex information. With Visio, you can transform complicated text and tables that are hard to understand into Visio diagrams that communicate information at a glance.
Visio provides modern shapes and templates for a diverse set of diagramming needs, including IT management, process modeling, building and architecture, UI design, human-resource management, project management, and more.
Data-connected Visio diagrams
Instead of static pictures, you can create data-connected Visio Professional 2010 and Visio Premium 2010 diagrams that display data, are easy to refresh, and dramatically increase your productivity. You can use the wide variety of diagram templates and stencils in Visio to understand, act on, and share information about organizational systems, resources, and processes throughout your enterprise.
You can integrate data to shapes from a variety of real-time data sources, including Excel, Access, SQL, SharePoint lists, or any OLEDB or ODBC data source, with just a few clicks in a Data Wizard.
Web drawings with Visio Services
Beyond basic sharing via e-mail or static web pages, the latest innovations in Visio 2010 allow users the ability to see rich, compelling visuals, shapes, and processes via their browser – even if they don’t have Visio. You can publish Visio Professional 2010 and Visio Premium 2010 web drawings using Visio Services, a feature of SharePoint Server 2010 that renders interactive and data-connected diagrams. Your Visio Web drawings can display data from a variety of sources, including Excel, SQL, SharePoint lists, or any OLEDB or ODBC data source.
Microsoft Office 2010 (also called Office 2010 and Office 14) is a productivity
suite for Microsoft Windows, and the successor to Microsoft Office 2007. Office 2010 includes extended file format support, user interface updates, and a changed user experience. With the introduction of Office 2010, a 64-bit version of Office is available, although not for Windows XP or Windows Server 2003. Office 2010 does not support Windows XP Professional x64 Edition.[

On April 15, 2010, Office 2010 was released to manufacturing, with those Volume Licensing customers who have Software Assurance being able to download the software from April 27, 2010. The suite became available for retail as well as online purchase on June 15, 2010.

Office 2010 marks the debut of free online versions of Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and OneNote, which work in popular web browsers (Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome and Safari, but not Opera). A new edition of Office, Office Starter 2010, replaced the low-end home productivity software, Microsoft Works.

Microsoft's update to its mobile productivity suite, Office Mobile 2010, will also be released for Windows Phones running Windows Mobile 6.5 and Windows Phone 7. In Office 2010, every application features the Ribbon, including Outlook, OneNote, Publisher, InfoPath, SharePoint Workspace (previously known as Groove), and the new Office Web Apps. Microsoft Support Microsoft Office 2010 Support Microsoft Office 2013 Support

Microsoft Visio 2010 Business Process Diagramming and Validation

* Create custom Validation Rules for structured diagrams and increase the accuracy of your business information with Visio 2010 Premium Edition
o Optimize your business information visualization by mastering out-of-the-box, structured diagram functionality with features like the Basic and Cross-Functional Flowcharts
o Create and analyze custom Validation Rules for structured diagrams using Visio Premium
o Get to grips with validation logic for Business Process Diagramming with Visio 2010, by using the provided Rules Tools add-in
o Discover the power of the ShapeSheet and learn how to write ShapeSheet formulae for use in Validation tests, following real and practical business examples and instructions
o Packed with screenshots to demonstrate immediately usable Visio practices for achieving your business visualization goals

In Detail

Microsoft Visio is a diagramming program using vector graphics, which ultimately allows business professionals to explore and communicate complex information more effectively. Through various visual representations, Visio enables complicated data to be presented in a clear, communicative, and data-connected way. Therefore, productivity is increased by utilizing the wide variety of diagrams that can convey information at a glance, as data can be understood and acted upon quickly. This book enables business developers to unleash the full potential of Diagram Validation that Visio 2010 Premium Edition has to offer.

This focused tutorial will enable you to get to grips with Diagram Validation in Visio 2010 Premium Edition to the fullest extent, enabling powerful automatic diagram verification based on custom logic and assuring correct and compliant diagrams. You will learn how to create and publish Rules, and use the ShapeSheet to write formulae. There is a special focus on extending and enhancing the capabilities of Visio 2010 diagram validation, and on features that are not found in the out-of-the-box product, like installing and using a new Rules Tools add-in, complete with source code, reviewing the new diagramming rules in flowchart and BPMN templates, and creating your own enhanced Data Flow Model Diagram template, complete with Validation Rules.

The book begins by covering the basic functions of Visio 2010, and then dives deep into showing you how to formulate your own Validation Rules and understand the Visio Object Model. ShapeSheet functions are explored in detail, as are creating Validation Rule Sets and Rules, and visualizing issues, with practical demonstrations along the way. Other content includes building a Rules Tools add-in using C#, creating test and filter expressions, and publishing Validation Rules for others to use. Finally, the book considers the creation and implementation of a new RuleSet for Data Flow Model Diagrams with a worked example.

By following the practical and immediately deployable examples found in the book, you will successfully learn both how to use the features of Microsoft Visio 2010, and how to extend the functionality provided in the box.

A comprehensive and highly practical Visio 2010 tutorial using Premium Edition, including example code and demonstrations for creating Validation Rules, writing ShapeSheet formulae, and much more

What you will learn from this book
o Master new Visio features supporting structured diagrams and Validation
o Learn new Validation functions, including creating and modifying Validation Rules to verify diagram correctness
o Successfully implement out-of-the-box content for Visio 2010
o Gain a deeper understanding of Visio as a diagramming tool and the Visio document structure
o Discover the Visio 14.0 Type Library
o Understand ShapeSheet functions for writing formulae in Validation tests
o Publish custom Visio templates that enforce company diagramming standards
o Build a Visio add-in for increased ease when creating Rules or analyzing existing Rules
o Use the provided Rules Tools add-in to export Validation Rules to XML
o View diagrams with corresponding issues using annotations

Approach

A focused tutorial, this book provides a range of practical examples with downloadable code, showing you how to create business process diagramming templates with Visio and enabling you to effectively visualize business information. It draws on real business examples and needs, and covers all the new features of Visio 2010 Premium Edition.



If you are a Microsoft Visio 2010 Premium Edition user or developer who wants to get to grips with both the basic features of Visio 2010 and the new Validation Rules in this edition, then this book is for you. A working knowledge of Microsoft Visio, and optionally .NET for the add-in code, is required, though previous knowledge of business process diagramming is not necessary. More experienced Visio users will gain valuable knowledge for building add-ins and creating and publishing rules. If you want to achieve results from Visio 2010 beyond the ordinary out-of-the-box features, then this book is ideal for you. Although this book covers the Premium Edition, much of the book is still useful if you are a Visio 2010 Standard Edition or Professional Edition user.

Thursday, January 13, 2011

Microsoft SharePoint 2010 System Requirements



System Requirements

To implement a SharePoint 2010 environment, your infrastructure must meet the

following minimum requirements:

· Windows Server® 2008 64-bit operating system with Service Pack 2 (SP2) or

later,or Windows Server 2008 R2

· Microsoft SQL Server® 2005 64-bit with SP3 and Cumulative Update 3 or later, or

SQL Server 2008 64-bit with SP1 and Cumulative Update 2 or later, or SQL Server

2008 R2

3 www.microsoft.com/sharepoint

For the complete and updated list of prerequisites for installing SharePoint 2010, see

"Determine hardware and software requirements (SharePoint 2010)"

Browser Requirements

SharePoint 2010 supports several commonly used Web browsers. Different browsers

offer different levels of support and functionality. Browser support for SharePoint 2010

can be divided into three categories:

• Supported

A supported Web browser is a Web browser that is known to fullytested with all features

and functionality to work with SharePoint Server 2010. If you encounter any issues,

support can help you to resolve these issues.

• Supported with known limitations

A supported Web browser with known limitations works with most features and

functionality, howeverif there is a feature or functionality that does not work or is

disabled by design, documentation on how to resolve these issues is readily available.

• Not tested

A Web browser that is not tested means that its compatibility with SharePoint Server

2010 is untested, and there may be issues with using the particular Web browser.

SharePoint Server 2010 works best with up-to-date, standards-based Web browsers.The

following are supported browser running on the Windows® operating system:

· Internet Explorer 7 32-bit

· Internet Explorer 8 32-bit

The following are supported browser options with known limitations:

· Internet Explorer 7 64-bit

· Internet Explorer 8 64-bit

· Firefox 3.6 32-bit on Windows operating systems

· Firefox 3.6 on non-Windowsoperating systems

· Safari 4.04 on non-Windows operating systems

4 www.microsoft.com/sharepoint

SharePoint 2010 does not support Internet Explorer 6for publishing site scenarios (such

as Internet facing ―.com sites). The Web Content Management features built into

SharePoint Server 2010 provide a deep level of control over the markup and styling of

the reader experience. Page designers can use these features to help ensure that the

pages they design are compatible with additional browsers, including Internet Explorer

6, for viewing content. However, it is the page designers’ responsibility to create pages

that are compatible with the browsers that they want to support.